What is Hyr.work?

Jon York

Member
Nov 30, 2018
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New York City
Hyr.work is actually one of the bright spots out there in the gig economy. They are putting gig workers together with traditional employers – rather than directly with customers. And instead of setting the prices, the clients offer what they’re willing to pay (which believe me, is usually a lot more than a normal gig company would charge if they were setting the prices)! It also leaves a little room for workers to negotiate the price or they simply don’t accept the job if the price is too low.

When I say they pair gig workers with traditional employers, I mean, “shift” employers – which in their case usually means restaurants and bars. Although they’re looking to expand into other “shift” sectors such as retail workers – especially during the holidays.

So, say you’re an experienced waiter or waitress… (sorry, “server”), and you have some time off or you just don’t have a regular gig. Well, you can sign on with Hyr and when a nearby restaurant needs some additional workers for the day you can accept the job and be working within the hour!

Pros: Hyr.work
There are many pros to this type of arrangement, including:
  • Anytime the gig company doesn’t set the price, you’re going to come out ahead.
  • Your reputation can really help you. In other gig jobs like driving for Uber and Lyft your reputation does nothing for you at all, in terms of getting more jobs. In other words, you can do an awesome job for all of your passengers but you’ll never see any of them ever again! So, all that hard work for a 5-star rating that you’re probably never going to get. (Only about 20% of passengers bother to rate their drivers anymore). But with this kind of work, you could very easily see the same employer again. If a restaurant manager likes you, they’re definitely going to want you to come back. So, you can really build a nice little business this way.
  • They give you points based on how much you earn. You get two points for every $1 earned. You can redeem 2,500 points for a paid day off! They say this day off is valued at $75. Which means points are worth 3 cents each. It doesn’t sound like much, I know, but check this out. If points are worth 3 cents each and you earn 2 points for every $1 you make, that means you’re getting 6 cents per dollar. Which still doesn’t sound like much, except that it’s 6%! Six percent may not sound like much but it’s better than nothing. And it adds up like crazy. It means you can earn enough points to get a paid day off by working about 62 hours at $20 per hour. (Hyr says their workers average $20 an hour). So that’s about every week and a half you can get paid for another day off! Of course you’re only getting paid $75 but take the day off and work anyway! Drive for Uber that day or something. Get paid for working and not working at the same time!
  • Points can also be used for vacation time, sick pay, health insurance, or you can simply cash it out once your balance reaches $50. The nice thing about Hyr’s point system is that at least the points are tied to a specific dollar amount. They’re not nebulous in the sense that you never really know what their value is.
  • It's a great way to get your foot in the door with a restaurant or bar that could lead to a full-time gig.
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Cons: Hyr.work
On the con side, we have:
  • Workers complaining that there’s simply not enough work. This is pretty typical with new startups. It takes them a while to balance out the number of workers they have on hand with the number of customers willing to “employ” them for a job.
  • Reading their app reviews, a lot of people reported troubles with the app where it didn’t seem to work properly at all times. This too is the symptom of a startup. So, hopefully that will get solved pretty quickly.
  • You don't always get to keep tips. Hyr lets the restaurants decide what they want to do with tips. Some restaurants let the gig workers keep the tips and others don't. The ones that don’t supposedly pay a higher hourly rate to help make up for it.
All-in-all, Hyr.work looks like a good company. They have shown (with their points program at least) that at least they’re thinking about ways to make gig economy jobs more attractive for the workers.

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Graham

Member
Feb 4, 2019
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Glendale AZ
In theory, this seems like a pretty good idea.

However, as someone who has worked in retail, rental, restaurant and more, I can say that everyone wants things done a certain way. Furthermore, sometimes days of training are required for a new worker if working with any sort of computer program (I had to train for 3 days before I could work at Macy's.)

But, I wish them all the best.
 

Austin Bob

Member
Dec 15, 2018
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San Antonio
I can say that everyone wants things done a certain way. Furthermore, sometimes days of training are required for a new worker if working with any sort of computer program (I had to train for 3 days before I could work at Macy's.)
You just hit on something that I've been thinking recently. Have you noticed that the quality of work you get from gig workers is really sub-par? And I thought this was strange too because I know restaurants I've worked in also required days of training. Even if you're an experienced restaurant hand you still need a few hours to get oriented and find your way around a new place.

I don't know, it's all making me long for the days when companies actually hired people and paid them real salaries and gave them training and had a lot of control over the quality of their work.
 

News Hound

Member
Jan 7, 2019
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The United States of America
We'll have to wait and see if they really deliver on any of these benefits. One thing about them is they take up to 30% of workers pay. they call themselves the Airbnb of hourly paid work. (Which is an analogy that doesn't make any sense). But Airbnb thrives off of just 15% of guest bookings. And in fact, they only charge hosts 3%. So, you set your price as a host and Airbnb only takes 3% of whatever price you choose.

Hyr kind of does the same thing. They let workers say how much they'd like to make and employers get to say how much they're willing to pay. So I guess there's some deal making that goes on. But why do they have to take 30%? That's twice as much as what Airbnb gets off of each booking? If they really want to be the Airbnb of hourly work, they would take just 3% of whatever the worker gets paid and they'd charge an additional 12% to the employer/client.
 

Graham

Member
Feb 4, 2019
141
10
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What City & State do you work in?
Glendale AZ
I think they just call themselves 'the Airbnb of hourly paid work' because it's a recognizable name. But 30 percent is way too much. That means if I work $12 an hour, they get almost $4 of that.

There are so many other services for gig-workers that take little or nothing at all. Why would I pick this one?